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Books Every Investor Should Read

These are classic books on investing that make for great reading. This will set you on the path to investing enlightenment.

"The Intelligent Investor" (1949) by Benjamin Graham
Published in 1949, "The Intelligent Investor" won't tell you how to pick stocks, but it does teach sound, time-tested principles that every investor can use. Plus, it's worth a read based solely on Warren Buffett's testimonial: "By far the best book on investing ever written."

"The Warren Buffett Way" by Robert Hagstrom
This book describes the investment ideas & philosophy of Warren Buffett

"The Scam" by Sucheta Dalal & Debashis Basu
This book gives you an insight of the who won, who lost, who got away from the scams which took place in the Indian capital market.

"Common Stocks And Uncommon Profits" (1958) by Philip Fisher
Fisher. "Common Stocks And Uncommon Profits" teaches investors to analyze the quality of a business and its ability to produce profits. Lessons are just as applicable half a century later.

"How To Make Money In Stocks" (1988) by William J. O'Neil
This is a great book to start with. Reading this book will provide you with a tangible system that you can implement right away in your research.

"Learn To Earn" (1995), "One Up On Wall Street" (1989) or "Beating The Street" (1994) by Peter Lynch
All three of Lynch's books follow his common sense approach, which insists that individual investors, if they take the time to do their homework, can perform just as well or even better than the experts.

"Stocks For The Long Run" (1994) by Jeremy Siegel
The book draws on extensive research over the past two centuries to argue not only that equities surpass all other financial assets when it comes to returns, but also that stock returns are safer and more predictable in the face of the effects of inflation.

"The Essays Of Warren Buffett: Lessons For Corporate America" (2001) by Warren Buffett and Lawrence Cunningham
This book is a collection of letters that Buffett wrote to shareholders over the past few decades. It's the definitive work summarizing the techniques of the world's greatest investor.

"Rich Dad Poor Dad" (1997) by Robert T. Kiyosaki
This book is all about the lessons the rich teach their kids about money, which, according to the author, poor and middle-class parents neglect. It holds an important financial lesson that may motivate you to start investing: the poor make money by working for it, while the rich make money by having their assets work for them.

"Common Sense On Mutual Funds" (1999) by John Bogle
If you own mutual funds, you should read this book.

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